First chapel in Mizoram.

From: ‘The Lushai Hills. A Story of the Lushai Pioneer Mission.’

By Grace R. Lewis.

Baptist Missionary Society, 1907.

‘All along children had visited the missionaries’ [Lorrain and Savidge’s] verandah, and there by simple stages began the higher work. Every Sunday a sacred picture was shown and talked about. Hymns they had composed or translated were taught and became popular—the Lushais are distinctly musical. Then a Catechism on the Bible was prepared with Scripture answers, that truths and texts might be learned together. After a time, grown-up people joined the Sunday School, and when in eagerness to get near they trod the garden down, it was time to build a little bamboo church. To speak or sing in a closed building was impossible, for in Lushai, men, women and children were inveterate smokers. The church was made with three sides, and the condition imposed that only those who came without pipes might sit inside; others must be content to stand in the open. The meetings were thronged outside and in. Pictures were found helpful in preaching, and a scene of the Crucifixion never failed to rivet attention.’

Page 32. ‘The Lushai Hills. A Story of the Lushai Pioneer Mission.’  

By Grace R. Lewis, 1907.